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Indonesia Gets Electronic ID Cards

In 2010, Indonesia launched a pilot project to provide national identification number or electronic identification card (e-KTP) to around 172 million people (population above the age of 16 years)… Since the beginning of the Single Identity Number System over a year ago, approximately 0.15 million people have been issued the e-KTP. The

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Renting out roofs for water harvesting

“Funded with Dr. B P Agrawal’s first World Bank Development Marketplace Award, Aakash Ganga (AG), or River from Sky, is a rainwater harvesting system currently installed in six drought‐prone villages in Rajasthan, the driest state in India.

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Health insurance for domestic workers

Providing labor regulations to support the poorest workers who are often left vulnerable to exploitation from their employers is a challenge throughout the globe. Naya Javeen in Pakistan has a novel solution.

“Naya Jeevan is a new venture launched in Pakistan in 2007 to cover a particular segment of the poor—household staff such as cooks, drivers, maids and gardeners—who are in the employ of their well-heeled countrymen who work for multinational corporations.

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Sources:

Intellecap January 2010, pages 1-3
http://newsletters.clearsignals.org/Intellecap_Jan2010.pdf#pg=1

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India finds success in ‘affordable private schools’

“Achieving universal primary education is listed as goal two in the Millennium Development Goals. Yet, the debate on who should deliver this service is still open. Education is seen widely among development professionals as deliverable by the State. Most developing countries, and particularly India, Bangladesh and Pakistan, have a public education system in place to provide education to the poor, but by most accounts, this system has not lived up to expectations.

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Sources:

Intellecap October 2009, pages 4-6
http://newsletters.clearsignals.org/Intellecap_Oct2009.pdf#pg=4

- Baird, Ross. Private Schools for the Poor. Grey Matters Capital, 2009. Tooley, James and Pauline Dixon. Private Schools for the Poor – A Case Study from India, CfBT Research and Development, 2003.

 Maleka Khatoon School: http://school4poor.com/docs_pdf/the_story.pdf

- Mati School: http://www.betterplace.org/projects/903-mati-school-education-for-extremely-poorchildren

 Private schools in Pakistan: http://www.yespakistan.com/education/private_schools.asp

 Clive Crook, The Ten-cent Solution, The Atlantic, http://www.theatlantic.com/doc/200703/crook-schools

 Richard Garner, Professor given $100m to save world's schools, The Independent,
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/education/education-news/professor-given-100m-to-saveworlds-schools-436574.html

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Pakistanis Travel to India for Treatment

"The healthcare system in Pakistan is in crisis . Government hospitals are
old and not maintained, and there is inadequate funding of the sector. There is growing violence against doctors who are perceived as wealthy targets and who are more likely to participate in the “medical brain drain” to the U .S ., Europe and the Middle East . There is a new, growing trend: every year, several hundred Pakistanis travel to India on health visas to get the healthcare they need, particularly for cardiac-related treatment . Congenital heart problems are common in Pakistan . The Pakistanis who

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In India, AIDS Risk Crosses Political Borders

"India’s AIDS epidemic has decreased drastically in the last decade. Yet... the deadly virus is highly concentrated in urban poor communities . Most vulnerable are sex workers and migrant laborers as well as their home
communities—often in rural areas or neighboring countries."
"Sex workers, largely teenage girls or younger from Nepal, are trafficked to the streets of India’s cities . One study found that more than 40% of Nepali sex workers tested HIV positive and that the number of the infected has increased 24-fold in the decade 1992-2002.

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The secret to Cote d’Ivoire success in urban water management

Providing affordbale clean water to both urban and rural poor is a major problem throughout the globe. This is especially the case when we consider the ‘poverty premium’ poor households have to pay for clean water. Most slums and rural communities lack the proper infrastructure for piped clean water, and therefore have to pay a premium in order to get water, let alone clean water. Within West Africa Côte d’Ivoire has found a more effective method for providing equitable water services for poor and marginalized communities.

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New Digital Education Device in South Africa Doesn't Need Broadband, Steady Power Supply

"A South African company, The Content Company, has piloted a device that will help rural scholars bridge the digital divide. The purpose is to connect
underprivileged schools to live online information, without the problems normally associated with using modern computers in these areas. The innovation is called Streetwise and does not require broadband, good access to power, decent infrastructure nor significant technical support to work and keep working. The devices communicate via GPRS enabling them to work everywhere."

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Saudi Government Invests in Women/Girls' Education

"Saudi Arabia has invested large sums of money in the education sector, and has recently begun placing more emphasis and importance on improving the conditions of female education in the country."

"There are several constraints in furthering female education that are prevalent in Saudi society, and the government is partnering with other sectors to change the situation. Local customs and traditions and early marriages for girls is the biggest cause for drop-outs amongst girls, especially in secondary school. The curriculum in girls’ schools has not been revised in over 20 years."

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New Culture Among Providers in West Africa to Increase Telecom Access

A new 14000km, ultra-high capacity (5 terabits per second) fibre-optic submarine cable made landfall on the west coast of Western Cape... after landing stops in 13 countries, 11 of which are on Africa's west coast. The cable is the first to be funded by all South Africa's major telecoms operators... The “open access model” employed for WACS (West African Cable System) is a system that allows all the funders or telecoms operators that own bandwidth capacity on the cable to have equal access, despite them not having landing sites of their own...."

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