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African urbanization trends

African nations are seeing the highest rate of urbanization throughout the globe. Much of this is due to rural urban migration patterns as people seek jobs and better lives.

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Aging Population a Major Problem in South Asia, too

"An October 2011 article on Dawn.com notes: “South Asia will experience a dramatic increase in its elderly population by nearly nine times between 2010 and 2025 when life expectancy will increase to 75 years for men and 82 years for women.”

While this is a problem for countries all over the world, South Asia faces some unique issues. Governments in the region don't devote many resources to the elderly:

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Migration of Seniors a Future Force in Southeast Asia, Could Create "Universal Design" Cities

Seniors are migrating around Southeast Asia, some to retire and some to find work. This creates a potential for Universal Design cities—built environments designed to be usable by anyone regardless of disability.

While Noviscape does mention "senior Singaporeans... finding employment as highly-skilled professionals, entrepreneurs, and investors in Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, and China" it mostly
discusses those traveling to retire:

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Aging Southeast Asian Population May Create "Grey Collar" Economy

According to Noviscape, “grey collar workers” will become the fastest growing segment of the workforce in countries such as Singapore and Thailand.
While rapid declining fertility and longer life expectancy are evident in every country in the region, they are aging at different rates.
“Singapore and Thailand have already been categorized as ageing societies since the early 2000s, Cambodia and Laos both have very young populations. The rest of ASEAN member states fall somewhere between these extremes, but are catching up fast.” (pg9)

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India to launch vocational education program

India’s Human Resources Development Minister announced that a vocational education program targeting students in grades 8-12 would be launched soon. “Colleges and universities in the country need to develop specialized courses as institutes in India are not producing skilled graduates who can be employed in industries and factories,” said the Minister.

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Future of India Could Hinge on Skills Training for Youth

According to Intellecap, in the next 20 years, India will add "250 million people to its working age population, compared to 18 million in Brazil and 10 million in China" (in the same time period).

India has the "highest number of young people in the world at 84.5 million (44% of the global youth population)who live in 'extreme poverty.' Further, 44 million (23% of world youth population)... are under-nourished."

Both the private and public sector, and sometimes the two in collaboration with one another, see opportunity to give these youth skills.

2.505
Average: 2.5 (2 votes)
 

Sources:

Intellecap May 2011 page 4, 5, 6:
http://newsletters.clearsignals.org/Intellecap_May2011.pdf#page=4

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Latin America Faces Growing Challenges for Pension System

"While for the last 25 years there has been decreasing social security coverage, Latin America's population over 65 is growing and will triple from 6.3% in 2005 to 18.5% in 2050. Also, labor markets continue to be highly informal, while independent and short-term employment have been increasing, which further complicates coverage and affiliation to retirement schemes. South American pension systems have been diverse in terms of coverage and quality, yet in no case have they incorporated all workers (see figure).

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Average: 3 (1 vote)
 

Sources:

FORO Nacional International, August 2010, pg. 2
http://newsletters.clearsignals.org/FORO_Aug2010.pdf#page=2

For an in depth look at labor issues see William Greider's One World Ready or Not: the manic logic of global capitalism

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MENA's demographic window of opportunity

MENA's population is currently about 50% below 24 years of age. By 2030 this youth bulge is expected to shift to constitute MENA's working age population. By 2030, 50% of MENA's population will be from 24 to 65 years of age. MENA will be in a special 'window of opportunity' wherein there will be an even split between working population and dependents. After 2030 the dependency ratio is expected to rise again.

2.2575
Average: 2.3 (4 votes)
 

Sources:

SFG Middle East Monitor, Sept 2010:
http://newsletters.clearsignals.org/SFG-ME_Sept2010.pdf
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