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Middle East unrest holds lessons for South America: indicators for political vulnerability

A host of factors led to the social uprisings in the Middle East in 2011, triggered in part by rising food prices; Bolivia, which also experienced unrest in that period, exhibits many of these factors and highlights vulnerability in itself and in the region.

Gonzalo Alcade of FORO writes,

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Sources:

FORO March 2011 pages 4-5:
http://newsletters.clearsignals.org/FORO_Mar2011.pdf#page=4

UNDP, Informe Nacional de Desarrollo Humano para Bolivia 2010, online at: http://idh.pnud.bo/index.php?option=com_hello&view=hello2&Itemid=56&id=6

Organización de las Naciones Unidas para la Agricultura y la Alimentación, “La volatilidad de precios en los mercados
agrícolas”. Informes de Política 12, available online at: http://www.fao.org/economic/es-policybriefs/es

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South American countries among the most vulnerable to climate change

A recent comparison of 233 countries shows the Bolivia and Columbia will be among the twenty most vulnerable countries to climate change in 2015, taking into account socio-economic dependence on nature, impacts of extreme weather, and weak institutional capacity to respond and adapt. GHG emissions have been increasing, and South American countries must find a sustainable model of development.

Maria Bazan of FORO writes,

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Sources:

FORO June 2011 pages 2 – 3:
http://newsletters.clearsignals.org/FORO_June2011.pdf#page=2

Wheeler, David (2011), “Quantifying vulnerability to climate change: implications for adaptation assistance”, CGD Working Paper 240. Washington, D.C.: Center for Global Development. http://www.cgdev.org/content/publications/detail/1424759

Véase: http://www.ipcc.ch/publications_and_data/ar4/wg1/en/faq-1-1.html
Garibaldi y Rey (2006), El Cambio Climático en América Latina y el Caribe, La Habana: PNUMA-SERMARNAT.

United Nation Framework Convention on Climate Change-UNFCCC (2007), Climate Change: Impacts, vulnerabilities and adaptation in developing countries, Bonn: UNFCCC; http://unfccc.int/resource/docs/publications/impacts.pdf

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Aging Southeast Asian Population May Create "Grey Collar" Economy

According to Noviscape, “grey collar workers” will become the fastest growing segment of the workforce in countries such as Singapore and Thailand.
While rapid declining fertility and longer life expectancy are evident in every country in the region, they are aging at different rates.
“Singapore and Thailand have already been categorized as ageing societies since the early 2000s, Cambodia and Laos both have very young populations. The rest of ASEAN member states fall somewhere between these extremes, but are catching up fast.” (pg9)

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